CDPL web site

World War I Letters

Reference Department Head Jodie Steelman Wilson has researched and transcribed a set of World War I correspondence in our collection and has begun to add new material to our existing collection. If you have anything to contribute to the ongoing project documenting Indiana’s World War I heritage or any questions about our effort, please contact Ms. Wilson at 765-362-2242 ext. 117 or e-mail ref@cdpl.lib.in.us

In the early 1960s, the Crawfordsville District Public Library received the war-related correspondence of Mrs. Cordelia (Brenneman) Thompson who lived in Cherry Grove, six miles north of Crawfordsville. The letters in the collection were mainly written by Mrs. Thompson’s two brothers, Amos and Roy Brenneman, who served during World War I. One additional letter was written by James Harley Barton, a local resident and friend of the Thompsons. Finally, a few letters from the War Department were also found in the collection.


Amos BrennemanAmos Brenneman was born July 13, 1898, died February 9, 1956, and was buried in Oakwood Cemetery in Sheffield, Alabama. He served in the Company C, 167th U.S. Infantry, served overseas, and was injured in combat at Croix Rouge Farm in France on July 26, 1918. His nine letters extend from July 22, 1917 to January 17, 1919. Amos Brenneman remained in the military after the war, eventually achieving the rank of Master Sergeant.


Roy BrennemanRoy Brenneman was born December 12, 1894, died October 8, 1961, and is buried in the Crawfordsville Masonic Cemetery. He spent the majority, if not the entire war, at Fort Dade, Florida. His letters indicate that he may have served in the Coastal Artillery Corp, Company 1; however, less specific information could be determined from his letters. Roy’s six letters date from November 11, 1917 to September 2, 1918.


Roy BrennemanJames Harley Barton was born August 30, 1898 in Linden, and died June 7, 1957. He is buried in the Linden Cemetery. Barton was a family friend of the Thompsons from Linden who also served in the war. Barton originally enlisted from Crawfordsville’s Company C, 2nd Indiana Infantry Regiment, later transferring to the 150th Field Artillery. Barton wrote just one of the letters in the collection. His single letter was written September 18, 1917 from Camp Mills, New York, the final stop before a soldier’s arrival in Europe.


Transcribing the Letters

You can view an image of each page of each letter. Two transcriptions are also provided for each letter. The first transcription reproduces the original text as it was written, including all misspellings, abbreviations, and so on. Illegible words were indicated by square brackets with question marks […?], and often a best guess was made. For ease of reading the original letter, line breaks are always made in the transcription to mirror the corresponding line in the letter. For the second transcription, spelling was corrected, abbreviations were expanded, capitalization was normalized, and punctuation marks were added. In several instances where it appeared a word or words was missing, these words were added in italic. However, grammar was not corrected so as not to change the voices of the young men.


22 July 1917: Amos Brenneman
7/22/1917 envelope front 7/22/1917 envelope back 7/22/1917 page 1 7/22/1917 page 2 7/22/1917 page 3

……….

July 22, 1917Montgomery Ala,
COC 2 Ala infDear brother [Bill?]How are you all fine I hope
This leave me feeling fine
I am at the 2 Rajmet
We have a fine bunk here
much better than B, Ham
but I had [of?] be in B 2 too,
then too be here,
They sure are hard on us
here they have M.P. all over
this place be leave me we haft
too solder.
But we have all kind of past
time here that we want.We went 10 day on our hight [hike?]
from B too here,
I think we are going too tright [try?]
Too Makling [Macon?] GA 15 of next m[onth?]
That is bout 225 mile well it
not so hard, as people think
it is.
On our hight [hike?] we had about
50 lb too carry, blanket gun
half of tent pon show [poncho] chang [change?]
of close belt and knife and dinner
But it was all over us.
I sent $15 home yesterday.
I think Pa is going too ARK
He cant stay out of timber
Are they conscriping up thereThey got about 300 here the
other day,
You had better try too cut
if you can.
Have you got you a girl
up there yet,
I think I write too about 100
I think,
They are a Bar shark some
of them
But not like Rose Ruth
Sprangs,
Well they are redy too close
up here so I will close
so ansure soon
frome Amos
July 22, 1917 Montgomery Ala,
COC 2 Ala infDear brother [Bill?]How are you all? Fine I hope.
This leaves me feeling fine.
I am at the 2[nd] Regiment
We have a fine bunk here,
much better than Birmingham
but I would rather be in Birmingham
than to be here.
They sure are hard on us
here; they have M.P.s all over
this place. Believe me, we have
to soldier.
But we have all kind of past
times here that we want.We went 10 days on our hike
from Birmingham to here.
I think we are going to hike
to Macon GA ,15th of next month
That is about 225 miles; well it is
not so hard as people think
it is.
On our hike we had about
50 lb to carry: blanket, gun,
half of tent, poncho, change
of clothes, belt, and knife and dinner.
But it was all over us.
I sent $15 home yesterday.
I think Pa is going to Arkansas.
He can’t stay out of timber.
Are they conscripting up there?They got about 300 here the
other day.
You had better try to cut
if you can.
Have you got you a girl
up there yet?
I think I [am] writing to about 100,
I think.
They are a bar sharks, some
of them,
but not like Rose Ruth
Sprangs.
Well they are ready to close
up here so I will close,
so answer soon.
From Amos

3 August 1917: Amos Brenneman
envelope envelope Letter Letter Letter

……….

Dear sister,
your letter an cake
was gladley recrived,
I sure was glade get it all
boys went crazy over it,
I gat 30 c[ents?] out of it
and then had all I could
eat,
They all sure brage on it being
so good,
I still like army as well ever
I gess I will get too come
beteen now 15 ch,

Tomorrow is pay day-
So I um going too have some
picture made rite way
I am glade too here you all
have a good crop of corn-
because that what
counts on a farm –
The last time I was at
home the crop was look
fine,
I got a letter frome home
they said that Papa was
in Louisiana they did not
say what he was doing
I gess falling timber
[works?]

Well I gess Roy is
haveing having a
good time is he not
I am glade is is
having good helth
Because that is the main
part of human life
Well it is growing dark
So I’ll close and get
redy for inspecting to
morrow,
Had beans for supper
I am full up,
Ansure soon
A


Dear sister,
Your letter and cake
was gladly received,
I sure was glad to get it all.
Boys went crazy over it;
I got 30 cents out of it
and then had all I could
eat.
They all sure brag on it being
so good.
I still like the army as well ever;
I guess I will get to come
between now and the 15th.Tomorrow is pay day —
So I am going to have some
picture made right away.
I am glad to hear you all
have a good crop of corn-
because that’s what
counts on a farm.
The last time I was at
home the crop was looking
fine.
I got a letter from home;
they said that Papa was
in Louisiana. They did not
say what he was doing.
I guess felling timber
works.Well I guess Roy is
having a
good time, is he not?
I am glad he is
having good health
because that is the main
part of human life.
Well, it is growing dark
so I’ll close and get
ready for inspection to-
morrow,
Had beans for supper
I am full up.
Answer soon.
A

18 September 1917: Harley Barton
envelope envelope letter letter letter

Camp Mills Long Island New YorkSep 18 Tues 1917

Dear Friend
Having been a long
while I saw you or talk to you
Having a little spare time, which
I thought I would write to you.
Well Clyed this army
life is some life. You can make
it a good life or a bad, if you
want to be a hobole or a bum
you can be it. But I will
take my a strait life, just
like playing pocker. A fellow
try to win one a strait.
Tell the truth about it I
don’t no the game my self and
other [versions?] to it. I’ve seen to many
of them in the Army. I never
though I would be in the Army
myself. Just the way I use
to haw hay stacks for you an
Campbell.

I use to be a rare bird me halling
hay shocks wasn’t I. Will not
talk about that so much. I will
tell you, New York some burg I
been there once since I’ve been
hear we are four mile from
the Ocean. I think we will be
across the pond this time next
month. I don’t care myself
where I’m at any more, tell the
truth about it. Your not young
but once when you die, you long
while dead. So you might as well
die one place as another. Well Clyed
thats all for this time. Hoping to
hear from you now soon.

From your young friend
Pvt. James Harley Barton.

Address over

Camp Mills Long Island New York

Sep 18 Tues 1917

Dear Friend
Having been a long
while I saw you or talk to you.
Having a little spare time, which
I thought I would write to you.
Well, Clyde, this army
life is some life. You can make
it a good life or a bad, if you
want to be a hobo or a bum,
you can be it. But I will
take my a straight life, just
like playing poker. A fellow
tries to win one a strait.
Tell the truth about it, I
don’t know the game myself and
other versions to it. I’ve seen too many
of them in the Army. I never
though I would be in the Army
myself. Just the way I use
to haul hay stacks for you and
Campbell.

I use to be a rare bird me hauling
hay shocks, wasn’t I? Will not
talk about that so much. I will
tell you, New York is some burg. I have
been there once since I’ve been
here; we are four miles from
the ocean. I think we will be
across the pond this time next
month. I don’t care myself
where I’m at anymore, tell the
truth about it. You’re not young
but once, and when you die, you are a long
while dead. So you might as well
die in one place as another. Well Clyde,
that’s all for this time. Hoping to
hear from you now soon.

From your young friend
Pvt. James Harley Barton.

Address over


10 October 1917 (envelope)
envelope envelope


13 October 1917 (envelope)
envelope envelope


11 November 1917: Roy Brenneman
envelope envelope letter letter

Dear Sis
I will try to write a
line. I have been here
one week. I like very
well am making
$2.75 per day. they
are not doing very
much now but think
they will be doing
something more
soon and talking
of raising wages.
I wonder how
the weather is up
there. it has been
very warm here,I don’t know just
how long I will
stay here, I may
go home and
work with Pa.
Can make about
as much. he has
gone back E with
Russell.
Will I am in a
hurry so will close
This leaves me
o.k.As ever
your brother
Roy
Dear Sis,
I will try to write a
line. I have been here
one week. I like it very
well and am making
$2.75 per day. They
are not doing very
much now but I think
they will be doing
something more
soon and talking
of raising wages.
I wonder how
the weather is up
there? It has been
very warm here,I don’t know just
how long I will
stay here, I may
go home and
work with Pa.
Can make about
as much. He has
gone back East with
Russell.
Well I am in a
hurry so will close.
This leaves me
o.k.As ever,
your brother,
Roy

1917 (envelope)
?? 1917: Amos Brenneman

envelope envelope

Handwritten on back of envelope:
167 US. Inf
Co. C
Hempstead – Long Island
New York

No letter


2 February 1918: Amos Brenneman
letter letter letter

Somewhere in Franc

Dear folks
How or you all injoying life
this cold winter,
This leave me feeling fine and
hope it will find you all the same
We sure have hude some cold weather
over in this part of the world
our first snow has lasted over
a month.
It sure gone hard with us who or not
use to so much snow.
Say Jack Haney got a discarge a few
days ago if he wint strate on to Winfield
he ought to be home there by now I am
sure you will see him get all of the news
Say have you herd frome me sench I
have cross over
I have writeing time or to have not recived
any ansure so I hope you all will get this
one

I got a packet frome Corda C. day
I sure did injoy eating some of that
old U.S. Candy and smoking some
good cigar.
Because that sure is something you
don’t see in this part of the world if
you do it take rich man to get it
you don’t have eny idea how hie stuff
is over here.
But we have as nice time as is expeced
[We?] have a goode Y.M.C.A had a few moveing
pictures the other night injoy our self
fine, and games and all others past time
we can get up.
Say what is Roy doing now and
has papa still got his old job the last
letter I got from Ben he talk like
they was going to get him in the drafted
army I hope they did not.
Is Della still at Guin? how is she and
Lynn getting by now.

Well I hope it wont be long until
we get to go back to the old U.S.A
Well I gess this is about as much as
the law alow,
So tell ever body I am making it
right tell to write every day I am anxious
to here frome you all,
We can only rite one
letter at a time so I will right as
often as I can so I will close
hopeing
to here from you soon
Pvt Amos D Brennman
COC 167 U.S. inf
A.S.F. N.I.A New York

Feb 2, 1918

Somewhere in France

Dear folks,
How are you all enjoying life
this cold winter?
This leaves me feeling fine and
hope it will find you all the same.
We sure have had some cold weather
over in this part of the world;
our first snow has lasted over
a month.
It sure has gone hard with us who are not
used to so much snow.
Say, Jack Haney got a discharge a few
days ago; if he went straight on to Winfield
he ought to be home there by now. I am
sure you will see him and get all of the news.
Say, have you heard from me since I
have crossed over?
I have written home but have not received
any answer so I hope you all will get this
one.

I got a packet from Corda C. today.
I sure did enjoy eating some of that
old U.S. candy and smoking some
good cigars.
because that sure is something you
don’t see in this part of the world — if
you do, it takes a rich man to get it.
You don’t have any idea how high stuff
is over here.
But we have as nice a time as is expected
We have a good Y.M.C.A; had a few moving
pictures the other night. Enjoyed ourselves
fine, and games and all others pastimes
we can get up.
Say what is Roy doing now, and
has papa still got his old job? The last
letter I got from Ben he talked like
they was going to get him in the drafted
army. I hope they did not.
Is Della still at Guin? how is she and
Lynn getting by now?

Well I hope it won’t be long until
we get to go back to the old U.S.A.
Well I guess this is about as much as
the law allows,
So tell everybody I am making it
right. Tell to write every day; I am anxious
to hear from you all.
We can only write one
letter at a time, so I will write as
often as I can, so I will close
hoping
to hear from you soon.
Pvt Amos D Brennman
COC 167 U.S. inf
A.S.F. N.I.A New York


1 March 1918: Roy Brenneman

envelope envelope letter letter letter

Mar 1 -18

Fort Dade Fla.
Co 1 c.a.c

Dear Sister

Your letter rec. some
few days ago glad to
hear from you sorry to
hear that you were having
trouble with your hand
hope it won’t be serious.
I Just got out of the
hospital today was there
18 days with mumps
came out o.k.

Sorry to hear that about the
corn being out yet in field.
It is real warm here now
looks like farming time.
I know it will be hot here this
summer but they say it is
cool at night. So one can sleep
good.
Well I was sory to hear that
the children at home have the
measles. hope they will not
be bad.
I guess I will go over to
St. Petersburg next week I
haven’t been off the Island
since I came here
There are lots of tourest over
there from Indiana and
Illinois. lots of them farmers.
Well as I have several
other letters to write
will close. I am sending
you a picture of myself

it isn’t very good
but best can get
over here.
hoping this finds
you lots better
leaves me o.k.

as ever
Roy

March 1, 1918

Fort Dade Fla.
Co 1 c.a.c

Dear Sister

Your letter received, some
few days ago, glad to
hear from you, sorry to
hear that you were having
trouble with your hand,
hope it won’t be serious.
I just got out of the
hospital today; was there
18 days with mumps,
came out o.k.

Sorry to hear that about the
corn being out yet in field.
It is real warm here now,
looks like farming time.
I know it will be hot here this
summer, but they say it is
cool at night. So one can sleep
good.
Well I was sorry to hear that
the children at home have the
measles. Hope they will not
be bad.
I guess I will go over to
St. Petersburg next week; I
haven’t been off the Island
since I came here.
There are lots of tourists over
there from Indiana and
Illinois. Lots of them farmers.
Well, as I have several
other letters to write,
will close. I am sending
you a picture of myself;

it isn’t very good
but the best one can get
over here.
Hoping this finds
you lots better.
Leaves me o.k.

As ever,
Roy


15 March 1918: War Department

letter

SD

WAR DEPARTMENT
THE ADJUTANT GENERAL’S OFFICE
WASHINGTON

March 15, 1918

Mrs. Clyde R. Thompson
R.R. #5, Box #51
Crawfordsville, Indinana

Dear Madam:

In reply to your letter of March 11th, I have the
honor to advise that for information regarding letters and
package mail to members of the American Expeditionary Force,
you should write to–

Foreign Mails Division
United States Post Office
Washington, D. C.

Very respectfully,

Austin A. Parker
Adjutant General


17 April 1918: Amos Brenneman
letter letter letter letter

letter letter letter

April 17 1918

Dear sister
I rec. your box
this afternoon while
eating supper. I mean
I sure was glade to here the
mail call out because
I was expecting it
every minet. that candy
sure was fine I could
not hardly set still
and eat it. Then after
eat some candy get to
smoke a good cigar
sure did go fine,

be sure and tell [Monie?]
that those cigar was
higley apa, and
wash it was so I could
return the favor –
It sure is a grate favor
to get eny thing like that
because it sure inpossible
to get such as that
in know man country
you know how long
I have been over here and
beside I have been all over
this country even to Parish
I never have seen eny candy
are cigar, cigarettes

unless they ware in a
Y.M.C.A. I gess you
think just like I did
before I came to this cou-
ntry. That it was
bilt up like U.S. but
nothe compard with U.S.
I was place where the
Roman soldier march
throw. Bible speak of
that place.

This sure is a
old country. I will put
a picture of one of our town
in here maby you will
get it.

Well I have just got
back frome a few
week duty in the
trenches. I will have a
few days rest here.
I sure hope this spring
that there will be some
chang made, because I
hope we wont haft
to spend a nothere winter
over here. look like
summer will never
come here it still
cold, I am sure you
have hade some warm
weather have you not

Well today one year
ago I walk out
to the fair ground to
be a soldier. But I did
not have the least idea
of being in F. at this
time.

But if my good
luck continues and I
can get back on the dear
old U.S. soild once more
safe and sound I mean
good timer hade better
hide, Because I am go-
ing to see my part
make up for lost time

I have often heard of war
and saw it in [movies?]
But I can see the real
thing and have it ever
hour in the day.
I have faird meny shots
wheather where I hit
are not I do not know
I gess I have written to
much all ready so I
will thank you all once
more for [boxes?] witch
I was glade to get,
Witch was hightley
apa [appreciated?] by me
and my best friend,

So I will close for
time hope this will
find you all as it leave
me all o.k. frome Amos
Co. C 167 U.S. Inf. A.E.F. [N.I.A.x]

Somewhere in France
April 17, 1918

Dear sister,
I received your box
this afternoon while
eating supper. I mean
I sure was glad to hear the
mail call out because
I was expecting it
every minute. That candy
sure was fine; I could
not hardly sit still
and eat it. Then after
eating some candy I got to
smoke a good cigar.
Sure did go fine.

be sure and tell Monie
that those cigars was
highly appreciated, and
wish it was so I could
return the favor –
It sure is a great favor
to get anything like that
because it is sure impossible
to get such as that
in no-man’s country.
You know how long
I have been over here and
beside I have been all over
this country, even to Paris
I never have seen any candy
or cigars, cigarettes

unless they were in a
Y.M.C.A. I guess you
think just like I did
before I came to this cou-
ntry, that it was
built up like U.S. but it is
nothing compared with U.S.
I was at a place where the
Roman soldiers marched
through. The Bible speaks of
that place.

This sure is an
old country. I will put
a picture of one of our towns
in here; maybe you will
get it.

Well I have just got
back from a few
weeks duty in the
trenches. I will have a
few days rest here.
I sure hope this spring
that there will be some
change made, because I
hope we won’t have
to spend another winter
over here. Looks like
summer will never
come here; it is still
cold, I am sure you
have had some warm
weather, have you not?

Well today one year
ago I walked out
to the fairground to
be a soldier. But I did
not have the least idea
of being in France at this
time.

But if my good
luck continues and I
can get back on the dear
old U.S. soil once more
safe and sound, I mean,
good times had better
hide, because I am go-
ing to see my part
make up for lost time.

I have often heard of war
and saw it in movies,
but I can see the real
thing and have it every
hour in the day.
I have fired many shots,
where I hit
or not I do not know.
I guess I have written too
much already, so I
will thank you all once
more for boxes which
I was glad to get,
which was highly
appreciated by me
and my best friend,

So I will close for
time; hope this will
find you all as it leaves
me all o.k. from Amos
Co. C 167 U.S. Inf. A.E.F. [N.I.A.x]


8 May 1918: Roy Brenneman

envelope envelope letter letter letter

Your letter rec. o.k.-
glad to hear all were
well,
I guess the people there
are buissy foriming [farming]
now. it sure is
warm here now but
there is a cool brease
most all the time
we can sleep good
at nights,
yes I would like to
go home while Dell
and Cora are there
but don’t guess I can
get off at this time.

We will go on gun
practice soon – then
next month the
mine boat will be
here so we will have
to plant mines all the
month, so we don’t
get any pass or fer-
lough un till after
that we are buissy
most all the time.
Well I don’t think
Clyde would like
the army at all.
At least there are not
many people that does
but we are not here because
we like it. it is one
place that one has

to hold there temper
for it is tried out
every day by some
one. it is a great
offence to strike a
soldier or to fight
no I haven’t heard from
Amos since Feb. –
Well I hope this finds
each and all well
leaves me o.k.
as ever your
Bro

Roy

Dear sis,
Your letter received o.k.–
glad to hear all were
well.
I guess the people there
are busy farming
now. It sure is
warm here now, but
there is a cool breeze
most all the time.
We can sleep good
at nights.
Yes I would like to
go home while Dell
and Cora are there
but don’t guess I can
get off at this time.

We will go on gun
practice soon – then
next month the
mine boat will be
here so we will have
to plant mines all the
month, so we don’t
get any pass or fur-
lough until after
that; we are busy
most all the time.
Well I don’t think
Clyde would like
the army at all.
At least there are not
many people that does
but we are not here because
we like it. It is one
place that one has

to hold their temper
for it is tried out
every day by some-
one. It is a great
offence to strike a
soldier or to fight.
No, I haven’t heard from
Amos since Feb. –
Well, I hope this finds
each and all well.
Leaves me o.k.
As ever, your
Bro,
Roy


30 July 1918: Amos Brenneman

letter

Somewhere in Franc,
July 30, 1918

Dear folks this leave
me on my way to the
hospital.
I was slightly
wonted the other day
I have been look after
by the U.S. Doctors, and
red cross, just fine.
I think I will get by
very well.
so I will write often
as I can
I also go[t] some gas —
not bad I don’t think
Hope this will
find you all well
As ever Amos Brenneman
Co. C 167 U.S. Inf.

Somewhere in France,
July 30, 1918

Dear folks, This leaves
me on my way to the
hospital.
I was slightly
wounded the other day.
I have been looked after
by the U.S. Doctors, and
Red Cross, just fine.
I think I will get by
very well,
so I will write as often
as I can.
I also got some gas —
not bad, I don’t think.
Hope this will
find you all well.
As ever, Amos Brenneman
Co. C 167 U.S. Inf.


6 August 1918: Amos Brenneman

letter letter

SomeWhere Franc

August 6, 1918

Dear folks-
This leave me in hospital
I got wounted long the last of
July. It is a flish wound
on my left thie so it
is not very bad. I can walk all o.k.
I gess I will be sent back
to my out fit rite away
I gess you all or getting all the
news from around Soissons
and Chateau Thierry. This war
is sure stuff but maby
pease will be declard some
time soon. I don’t see how it
can last very much longer
at the rate we ar going now
Paper is scrace so I will close an soon [ever?]
Amos, Co C 167 US Inf,

Part of another letter on reverse

let me know about my in-
lotments. how much you
get, and when – Because I
want you to get all of it
with July pay will have
$75 at 1500 per month
then I have out $10000 insurance
I get you know about it
by this time,
well I gess the people back
in state don’t know the war
is going on maby they
think they do, I gess you
all ar getting plenty of good
eats now. such as beans and
so on, if I had
a big bate of beans and
bskit, I think I could make
another year, on one meal
I have almost done it so far

Somewhere France

August 6, 1918

Dear folks —
This leaves me in hospital.
I got wounded along the last of
July. It is a flesh wound
on my left thigh so it
is not very bad. I can walk all o.k.
I guess I will be sent back
to my outfit right away.
I guess you all are getting all the
news from around Soissons
and Chateau Thierry. This war
is sure stuff but maybe
peace will be declared some-
time soon. I don’t see how it
can last very much longer
at the rate we are going now.
Paper is scarce so I will close answer soon
Amos, Co C 167 US Inf,

Part of another letter on reverse

let me know about my al-
lotments, how much you
get, and when – because I
want you to get all of it;
with July pay will have
$75 at 1500 per month
then I have out $10000 insurance.
I guess you know about it
by this time.
Well I guess the people back
in state don’t know the war
is going on; maybe they
think they do, I guess you
all are getting plenty of good
eats now, such as beans and
so on; if I had
a big plate of beans and
biscuits, I think I could make
another year, on one meal.
I have almost done it so far


6 August 1918: Roy Brenneman

envelope envelope letter letter letter

Envelope addressed:
Mrs. Clyde Thompson
Crawfordsville Indiana
R.R. #5
Postmark:
Fort Dade Fla.
Aug 8 1918 7 a.m.

Return address:
Fort Dade, Fla.
1st Co. Aug 6.

Dear Sister
you letter rec. some few
days ago glad to hear
you were all well.
I am all o.k. Sure has
been a hot day.
I had a letter from Father
he said he was going
home abot 15th this mo.
Sell out and [move?] to
Sheffield. Ben says they
can make good wages
up there so if he could
get a good job and
stay at home, it would
be lots better for mother
and children.
Well we have a new
commanding officer, now
I think he will be better

about giving us furlough
so I may put in for
one some time in Oct
about the first. Well I
think I can get the 1 cent
rate, if the C. [commanding?] officer
gives us a card to
show that we are on a
furlough then we can
get the 1 cent rate.
I had a letter from Amos
last night written
June 19 guess you have
heard from him since
then, they sure are doing
some great work over
there, if we could get at
them with what men
we have now all at one
time it would be good
by Kiser tho I think
it will last a long

time yet. but we can’t
tell what will happen
I was reading a letter a
soldier had written home
he said it was a sin to
have to kill some of the
German soldiers, they were
kids 14 and 15 years old
so if they have to take the
kids, they are about thro.
Well I want to write Mary
and the others so
we’ll close hoping
this finds each and
all well, leaves
me o.k.

ans soon
as ever
Roy

Dear Sister,
Your letter received some few
days ago; glad to hear
you were all well.
I am all o.k. Sure has
been a hot day.
I had a letter from Father;
he said he was going
home about the 15th this month.
Sell out and move to
Sheffield. Ben says they
can make good wages
up there so if he could
get a good job and
stay at home, it would
be lots better for mother
and children.
Well we have a new
commanding officer, now.
I think he will be better

about giving us furlough
so I may put in for
one sometime in October,
about the first. Well I
think I can get the 1-cent
rate; if the commanding officer
gives us a card to
show that we are on a
furlough, then we can
get the 1-cent rate.
I had a letter from Amos
last night, written
June 19. Guess you have
heard from him since
then; they sure are doing
some great work over
there; if we could get at
them with what men
we have now all at one
time it would be good-
bye Kaiser though I think
it will last a long

time yet. But we can’t
tell what will happen.
I was reading a letter a
soldier had written home;
he said it was a sin to
have to kill some of the
German soldiers, they were
kids 14 and 15 years old,
so if they have to take the
kids, they are about through.
Well, I want to write Mary
and the others so
we’ll close hoping
this finds each and
all well. Leaves
me o.k.

Answer soon,
As ever,
Roy


21 August 1918: Roy Brenneman

envelope envelope letter letter

Envelope addressed:
Mrs. Clyde R. Thompson
Crawfordsville Indiana
Postmark:
Fort Dade Florida
Aug 22 1918 7 a.m

Return address:
none

Fort Dade Fla.
1st Co. Aug 21

Dear Sister, Your letter rec
glad to hear from you, and
all were well.
I am feeling o.k am back to
drilling again one feels
better to get plenty of exercise
Well I can’t say when I will
get a furlough there are
so many a head of me
they only let 5 out of a
company at one time so
if you can go home in
Sept. go a head or I will
see just when I can get
one, no the government
doesnt hold any money

for our clothes unless we loose
some we have to pay for every
little thing that is lost.
Yes we get paid regularly once a month
tho I dont have enough to bother about
enough tho to pay expenses.
Say I have [2?] Liberty Bonds made to
Father they will be due in February
one will be paid for this month so
I would like to let some one have
the other one. Are any of you folks
able to take it. I would like to have
enough to go to town once in a while
a guy will go nuts on this place if
he never goes any place. if you
haven’t [xny] it is good investment. but I may
not be here in U.S.A. many more
month so I don’t to care to [stay?] on
this place all time. now if Clyde don’t
feel able financily. Why its ok. I
can get by.
Well hope this finds all ok leaves
me well ans
as ever Roy

Fort Dade Fla.
1st Co. Aug 21

Dear Sister, Your letter received,
glad to hear from you, and
all were well.
I am feeling o.k., am back to
drilling again; one feels
better to get plenty of exercise.
Well I can’t say when I will
get a furlough; there are
so many ahead of me.
They only let 5 out of a
company at one time so
if you can go home in
Sept. go ahead, or I will
see just when I can get
one. No, the government
doesn’t hold any money

for our clothes; unless we lose
some we have to pay for every
little thing that is lost.
Yes, we get paid regularly once a month
though I don’t have enough to bother about
enough, though, to pay expenses.
Say I have 2 Liberty Bonds made to
Father; they will be due in February,
one will be paid for this month, so
I would like to let someone have
the other one. Are any of you folks
able to take it? I would like to have
enough to go to town once in awhile;
a guy will go nuts on this place if
he never goes any place. If you
haven’t any it is good investment. But I may
not be here in U.S.A. many more
months so I don’t to care to stay on
this place all [the] time. Now if Clyde don’t
feel able financially, why, it’s ok. I
can get by.
Well, hope this finds all ok. Leaves
me well. Answer,
As ever, Roy


2 September 1918: Roy Brenneman

envelope envelope letter letter
Envelope addressed:
Mrs Clyde Thompson,
Crawfordsville, Indiana R.R. 5
Postmark:
Fort Dade Fla.
September 3 1918

Return address:
none

Fort Dade, Fla.
1st Co. Sept 2

Dear Sister
Just a few lines.
I wrote you a few days ago.
I mentioned something about
you takeing one of my L Bonds
I have desided that I Will Keep
them. for if I ever get out
of this I Will have that
much to start on.
Most all the Boys that
came here when I did have
gone. there will be a hund[red?]
leave here today. So I may
be called most any time.
I see that men up to 45
will have to register guess
every bodys will be in
this game before it is over.

Well I think the folks have
desided to stay there untill
they gather their crop
I heard from Della she is
having a hard time with the
kid.
Well there is no news from
this place. So in regards
to what I said about the Bonds
I Will With draw the offer
for I may need them some
day.
Well I hope this finds each
and all well. leaves me
o.k.
ans
as ever your
Bro
Roy


Fort Dade, Florida
1st Co. Sept 2

Dear Sister,
Just a few lines.
I wrote you a few days ago.
I mentioned something about
you taking one of my L Bonds.
I have decided that I will keep
them, for if I ever get out
of this I will have that
much to start on.
Most all the boys that
came here when I did have
gone. There will be a hundred
leave here today. So I may
be called most any time.
I see that men up to 45
will have to register; guess
everybody will be in
this game before it is over.

Well, I think the folks have
decided to stay there until
they gather their crop.
I heard from Della; she is
having a hard time with the
kid.
Well, there is no news from
this place. So in regards
to what I said about the Bonds
I will withdraw the offer,
for I may need them some
day.
Well, I hope this finds each
and all well. Leaves me
o.k.
Answer,
As ever, your
Bro,
Roy


1 October 1918: Roy Brenneman

envelope envelope letter letter

Envelope addressed:
Mrs. C. R. Thompson
Crawfordsville, Indiana
R.R. 5
Postmark:
Fort Dade, FLA
Oct 4 7am 1918

Return address:
none

Fort Dade Fla
Dear Sister
Just a few lines
to let you know
that I am OK.
We havent any of
the flue here yet
We are not alowed to
leave the Island
nor any one to come
here.

There were about
300 men came in
last night so if
they dont bring it
here we are not
likely to have
any of it here.
Must go
as ever
Roy


Fort Dade, Fla
Dear Sister,
Just a few lines
to let you know
that I am OK.
We haven’t had any of
the flu here yet.
We are not allowed to
leave the Island,
nor any one to come
here.

There were about
300 men who came in
last night, so if
they don’t bring it
here we are not
likely to have
any of it here.
Must go.
As ever,
Roy


10 December 1918: War Department (envelope)

envelope envelope

Postmark:
Washington, D.C.
Dec. 10 1918 4pmReturn address:
War Department
The Adjutant General’s Office
Official Business

No letter


18 December 1918: Amos Brenneman

letter
letter Letter envelope

Dec. 18 1918

Dear Sister
your letter no 11-
came to hand yesterday
I was glad to here from
you. This leave me all
ok.
I am now about
150 miles in the state
of G. And be leave me
it is not like U.S. at
all. All thow we are
treated better by the
German people then
I expected.
We have been
hiking for about 20 days
we hike frome France –
throw Belgique, and
Luxembourg –
and I think we
have reach our destia-
nation. I think we will
be here for a while-
we have a swell place
to stay.
This family
gave us there front room
to sleep in all thow we
half to sleep on the floor
but that is nothing
strong.
Well I gess we
will start to [drilling?]
tomorrow, but the days
are short it can’t be
long.
Xmas will
soon be here and I
sure wish I could be
home, But if nothing
happen I think will
be home by the
4th of July, eny way
I think we have done
our shore and we aur to
be among the 1 [div?] to leave
Well I have got to grank a B. of
Beer. That one thing we
have plinney of over here
but I don’t so much for
it iny way. Well I will
close, hope this find you all o.k.
P.S. you worre about me being
wounded I was slite wounded
on the 29 of July*. the first
and last time.

So Ansure soon
As ever Amos D
CoC 167 US Inf A.E.F

*If Amos was correct about the date, this conflicts with the War Department notification, which specified July 26 as the date of his injury. This would place the injury at the time of the 167th infantry regiment’s crossing of the Ourcq River


Dec. 18 1918

Dear Sister,
your letter no. 11
came to hand yesterday.
I was glad to hear from
you. This leaves me all
ok.
I am now about
150 miles in the state
of Germany. And believe me,
it is not like U.S. at
all. Although we are
treated better by the
German people then
I expected.
We have been
hiking for about 20 days
we hike from France –
through Belgique, and
Luxembourg –
and I think we
have reached our desti-
nation. I think we will
be here for a while —
we have a swell place
to stay.
This family
gave us their front room
to sleep in although we
have to sleep on the floor
but that is nothing
[wrong].
Well I guess we
will start to [drilling?]
tomorrow, but the days
are short it can’t be
long.
Xmas will
soon be here and I
sure wish I could be
home, but if nothing
happens I think will
be home by the
4th of July. Anyway
I think we have done
our share and we are to
be among the 1 [division] to leave.
Well I have got to [drink] a [bottle] of
beer. That’s one thing we
have plenty of over here
but I don’t go much for
it anyway. Well I will
close, hope this finds you all o.k.
P.S. you worry about me being
wounded I was slightly wounded
on the 29th of July*. The first
and last time.

So answer soon.
As ever, Amos D
CoC 167 US Inf A.E.F

*If Amos was correct about the date, this conflicts with the War Department notification, which specified July 26 as the date of his injury. This would place the injury at the time of the 167th infantry regiment’s crossing of the Ourcq River


31 December 1918: Amos Brenneman

letter letter

Lohndorf, Germany
Dec. 31 1918

Dear Sister,

I rec your letter no 13 yesterday
and also the 200. money order it sure
will come in good play, but if you
we have not less then 1 houndred
or 75 we have no money at all. You
can’t go in a café, and by a dinner un
less 75 marks that 3.4 that is about
13 dollar, so you see we need know
money to by such as that, they ant
but 1 time I want money that is
when I get back to U.S. I am going
to by me a nice unform to ware
home, I wont know what
to do when I get where I can take a batch
and chang close ever once and a while
these darn lise first keep us wored
to death all the time I can’t see how we
have as good helth as we do

because ever one in the Co is
just full of them, and know way
to get read of them, Into week after
we lonted in France I got thoese
thing on me and have not got
what of things yet, so you see what
kind of a life we have been living
for the last 12 month.
Well frome the looks frome
ever thing maby well be home
by the 4th of July. but we are
unlucky. I will bet we will be
the last one to leave, but I have
know luck coming, I think I was
offull lucky to get through this
thing alive, well I gess you had a good
time Xmas, I mean this was the happy
Xmas ever spent, we did not have
know more then any other day but
to think about the war being over
was what made ever body happy
So I will close.
So good by ansure soon
Amos D.


Lohndorf, Germany
Dec. 31, 1918

Dear Sister,

I received your letter no. 13 yesterday
and also the $200 money order; it sure
will come in good play, but if
we have not less than 1 hundred
or $75 we have no money at all. You
can’t go in a café, and buy a dinner unless
you have 75 marks, that’s 3.4, that is about
13 dollars, so you see we need no
money to buy such as that, they aint
but 1 time I want money, that is
when I get back to U.S. I am going
to by me a nice uniform to wear
home, I won’t know what
to do when I get where I can take a bath
and change clothes every once in a while;
these darn lice just keep us worked
to death all the time. I can’t see how we
have as good health as we do

because everyone in the Company is
just full of them, and there is no way
to get rid of them, not one week after
we landed in France I got those
things on me and have not got
rid of things yet, so you see what
kind of a life we have been living
for the last 12 months.
Well from the looks from
everything maybe we’ll be home
by the 4th of July, but we are
unlucky. I will bet we will be
the last ones to leave, but I have
no luck coming; I think I was
awful lucky to get through this
thing alive; well I guess you had a good
time at Xmas, I mean this was the happiest
Xmas ever spent. We did not have
no more than any other day, but
to think about the war being over
was what made everybody happy,
So I will close.
So goodbye, answer soon.
Amos D.


8 January 1919: War Department

letter

WAR DEPARTMENT
THE ADJUTANT GENERAL’S OFFICE
WASHINGTON

January 8, 1919

201 (Brennerman [sic], Amos D)CD

B. F. Brenneman,
Epes, Ala.

Sir:

The latest information received at this office
shows that Private Amos D. Brennerman, Company C, 167th Infantry,
was severely wounded July 26th.

For more information concerning him, you should write
to

Bureau of Communications
American Red Cross,
Washington, D.C.

Respectfully,

Austin A. Parker

Adjutant General


17 January 1919: Amos Brenneman

letter letter letter

Lohndrof Geramany
Jan 17 1919

Dear sister I rec
your letter yesterday no 16
I don’t think I have rec
no 14, 15 yet, Well I don’t
know much news, we had
some maneuvering we had
a big barage when we went
over the top officers frome
ever where was here to see
us go over 1 man got kill
2 got wounded I think
that is to bad to think

they made the war and
got kill, after ever thing
is over. they takeing more
[moving?] Pictures, of us, maby
you will get to see it
They was about 1500 of us
pick out of the 42 div to
pull this off. it sure did seem
like the real thing, well
the only thing I want
them to do is to talk about
takeing us back to U.S. – We
have been over here 14 month
that just [around?] 13 month

and 29 days to much for
me, I dont be leave I w
ould no what to do if I
were I could get pliney
to eat, and a good place
to sleep also, some good
close to ware. I am all
most a shame to have
my picture made in
thease rages, Well I gess
you have gotten my letter
by now, So I will close ansure
soon. As ever Amos.
CoC 167 US Inf.


Lohndorf, Germany
Jan 17, 1919

Dear sister, I received
your letter yesterday, no. 16.
I don’t think I have received
nos. 14, 15 yet. Well I don’t
know much news; we had
some maneuvering, we had
a big barrage when we went
over the top. Officers from
everywhere was here to see
us go over. 1 man got killed,
2 got wounded, I think.
That is too bad to think.

they made the war and
got killed, after everything
is over. They are taking more
moving pictures, of us; maybe
you will get to see it.
They was about 1500 of us
picked out of the 42nd division to
pull this off. It sure did seem
like the real thing. Well
the only thing I want
them to do is to talk about
taking us back to U.S. – We
have been over here 14 months
that’s just around 13 months

and 29 days too much for
me. I don’t believe I
would know what to do if I
were I could get plenty
to eat, and a good place
to sleep; also, some good
clothes to wear. I am almost
ashamed to have
my picture made in
these rags, Well I guess
you have gotten my letter
by now, so I will close. Answer
soon. As ever Amos.
CoC 167 US Inf.


undated envelope

envelope envelope

Envelope addressed:
Clyde R Thompson
Crawfordsville, Indiana

Return address:
Pvt Amos D Brenneman
Co C. 167 Inf
American EX. Forces
A.P.O. 715

Handwritten on front of envelope:
[illegible signature]
2 L.T. U.S. Army
U.S.A.

Stamped on envelope:
A.E.F. Passed As Censored 449

No letter


undated letter

letter

…pondence on this subject refer to 201 (Mis. Div.)

WAR DEPARTMENT
THE ADJUTANT GENERAL’S OFFICE
WASHINGTON

Mrs. Clyde R. Thompson
R.D. #5 Box 51
Crawfordsville, Ind.

Referring to your communication of recent
date, requesting permission to send a package to a
soldier who is now a member of the American Expedi-
tionary Forces, I beg leave to inform you as follows:

The War Department fully appreciates the
kind interest of friends and relatives in their desire
to send gifts to those at the front, and regrets that
any curtailment of the privilege is necessary, but
in view of the large amount of oversea traffic it
has become necessary to issue instructions that in
future, shipments of any articles to members of the
American Expeditionary Force be limited to those ar-
ticles which have been requested by the individuals
to whom the same are to be shipped, such request hav-
ing been approved by regimental or higher commanders.
Parcel post shipments wil be accepted by the post
office authorities and freight and express companies
will accept other shipments only upon presentation
of the above approved request in each individual case.

Your letter is returned herewith.

Very truly yours,

Roy A. Hill

Adjutant General